Writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia. Writing Medieval Biography, 750 2019-02-09

Writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia Rating: 5,9/10 566 reviews

Writing medieval biography, 750

writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia

We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. Perhaps the best attested narrative form of the Middle Ages, it continues to draw modern historians of the medieval period to its peculiar challenge to explicate the general through the particular: the biographer's decisions to impose or to resist the imposition of order on biographical remnants raise issues which go to the heart of historical method. This review began by posing the question whether biography should be regarded as a legitimate activity for the professional historian. J ane M artindale, Secular Propaganda and Aristocratic Values: The Autobiographies of Count Fulk le Réchin of Anjou and Count William of Poitou, Duke of Aquitaine. Ranging from pivotal figures such as Charlemagne, William the Conqueror and St Bernard, to the anonymous female skeleton in an Anglo-Saxon grave, from kings and queens to clerks and saints, and from individual to the collective biographies, this collection investigates both medieval biographical writings, and the issues surrounding the writing of medieval lives. Bates, too, is also concerned to explore the narrative sources relating to his subject, William the Conqueror.

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Writing medieval biography, 750

writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia

Three contributors, Richard Abels, Simon Keynes, and David Bates discuss the challenge of writing about well known medieval figures, where the biographer has to clear the ground of past historiography before turning again to the sources. Geoffrey was every bit as important a political figure as the better known Abbot Suger, and his architectural patronage deserves closer attention for, as Grant points out, the famous portals of the west facade of the cathedral at Chartres date from his time. Rabinowicz, The Foucault Reader, London 1991, 342. David Bates, Julia Crick, Sarah Hamilton, editors. McFarlane, The Nobility of Later Medieval England Oxford, 1973 , p. Writing Medieval Biography 750—1250: Essays in Honour of Professor Frank Barlow. Perhaps the best attested narrative form of the Middle Ages, it continues to draw modern historians of the medieval period to its peculiar challenge to explicate the general through the particular: the biographer's decisions to impose or to resist the imposition of order on biographical remnants raise issues which go to the heart of historical method.

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Writing Medieval Biography, 750

writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia

Ranging from pivotal figures such as Charlemagne, William the Conqueror and St Bernard, to the anonymous female skeleton in an Anglo-Saxon grave, from kings and queens to clerks and saints, and from individual to the collective biographies, this collection investigates both medieval biographical writings, and the issues surrounding the writing of medieval lives. Bibliography Includes bibliographical references and index. Sources present challenges, not just for what they say but what they leave unsaid, for striking a balance between portrayal of stereotypes or of individuals, for telling stories which may or may not reveal more than a talent to amuse. To purchase short term access, please sign in to your Oxford Academic account above. Jane Martindale discusses two different autobiographies from early-twelfth-century France, the Latin life of Fulk le Réchin, count of Anjou, and the vernacular life of William, count of Poitou and duke of Aquitaine.

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Writing Medieval Biography, 750

writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia

Writing Medieval Biography 750—1250: Essays in Honour of Professor Frank Barlow. Nelson, Robin Fleming, Barbara Yorke, Richard Abels, Simon Keynes, Pauline Stafford, Elisabeth Van Houts, David Bates, Jane Martindale, Christopher Holdsworth, Lindy Grant, Marjorie Chibnall, Edmund King, John Gillingham, David Crouch, and, Nicholas Vincent. Professor David Bates is Director of the Institute of Historical Research; Dr. David Crouch puts himself in the shoes of John of Earley, the biographer of William Marshal, and considers the source material on which John could draw, speculating that there may have been a Marshal family archive, chamber accounts, and even possibly a tournament roll. In the first group, Janet Nelson explicitly addresses a central problem for all biographers getting to grips with the interior life of a subject who lived so long ago and about whom surviving source material is at first sight unhelpful.

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Writing Medieval Biography, 750

writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia

Barlow, Camden Society, 3rd series, 61 1939. She discusses how far it is possible to understand the interior life of the Emperor Charlemagne, arguing that it is possible to piece together information about his family life, sense of humour, his sex life, and the desire for reformation of self. Ranging from pivotal figures such as Charlemagne, William the Conqueror and St Bernard, to the anonymous female skeleton in an Anglo-Saxon grave, from kings and queens to clerks and saints, and from individual to the collective biographies, this collection investigates both medieval biographical writings, and the issues surrounding the writing of medieval lives. The papers fall into four main groups. The contributors include: Janet L. A third group of papers looks at medieval authors. You can change your cookie settings at any time.

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Did Charlemagne have a private life? [in] Writing medieval biography, 750

writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia

Barbara Yorke reviews the sources available to those who wrote the histories of female saints in Anglo-Saxon England, suggesting that in a few cases these included nuggets of genuinely biographical information. . Writing Medieval Biography is the volume arising from most of the papers delivered at a conference held at Exeter University in 2004 to honour Frank Barlow, himself the author of three distinguished historical biographies of Edward the Confessor, William Rufus, and Thomas Becket , and in memory of the late Tim Reuter, one of the moving spirits behind the conference. Even if courtly literature is usually linked to a chivalrous and idyllic lifestyles, the fifteen unique essays during this assortment display that the search for romance on the earth of medieval courtly literature was once underpinned by means of violence. As Barlow himself put it in the preface to his biography of William Rufus,. There are various possible explanations, including different literary preoccupations for writers based within the Angevin empire, and he points out that historians should not be beguiled by these into exaggerating the contrast between the English and French monarchies.

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Writing Medieval Biography 750

writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia

Sarah Hamilton teach in the Department of History at the University of Exeter. E lisabeth V an H outs, The Flemish Contribution to Biographical Writing in England in the Eleventh Century. Davis argued in favour of Robert of Lewes, bishop of Bath, but King draws attention to references to the prominence of London, and suggests, reasonably enough, that the author may have been a monk or a canon of London. Perhaps the best attested narrative form of the Middle Ages, it continues to draw modern historians of the medieval period to its peculiar challenge to explicate the general through the particular: the biographer's decisions to impose or to resist the imposition of order on biographical remnants raise issues which go to the heart of historical method. P auline S tafford, Writing the Biography of Eleventh-Century Queens. The prefatory essay by David Bates, Julia Crick, and Sarah Hamilton outlines the history of biography, with most attention being devoted to the medieval centuries but briefly reviewing the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and outlining some of the key themes of the conference. Barlow, William Rufus London, 1983 , p.

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Alfred and his Biographers: Images and Imagination

writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia

She suggests a possible reason may have been that potential patrons were not seen as figures who could deliver peace. R ichard A bels, Alfred and His Biographers: Images and Imagination. Don't already have an Oxford Academic account? Edmund King offers a reconsideration of the identity of the anonymous author of the Gesta Stephani. Van Houts draws attention to the seeming paradox that although there was a good deal of hagiographical writing by Flemish authors, they did not turn their attention to the lay nobility. Dress takes us to how the self is gendered and privately constructed, and how it is publicly displayed. Robin Fleming offers an analysis of the evidence of bones from medieval cemeteries to discover what can be known about the nameless members of medieval communities.

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Did Charlemagne have a private life? [in] Writing medieval biography, 750

writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia

Drawing on Socrates' Symposium , Nye advances this proposal via not just exploring the unique non secular which means of Diotima's instructing but additionally how that which means has been misplaced all through time. In contrast to many of the newer approaches towards the past, biography smacks of a very traditional top-down, mostly man-centred, approach. Keynes faces a different problem when writing of King Æthelred, whose reputation as a pretty-hopeless king rests on a narrative in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle which oversimplifies what was evidently a complicated period by creating an impression of an inexorable build up of Danish attacks against which English resistance inevitably failed. Few women's voices have survived from the antiquity interval, yet facts indicates that, specially within the quarter of faith, ladies have been influential in Greek tradition. Publisher's Summary Biography is one of the oldest, most popular and most tenacious of literary forms.

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David Bates, Julia Crick, Sarah Hamilton, editors. Writing Medieval Biography 750

writing medieval biography 750 1250 hamilton sarah bates david crick julia

N elson, Did Charlemagne Have a Private Life? Vincent ponders the absence of biographies of the Plantagenet kings. Life then was literally nasty, brutish, and short—at least it was until the close of the twelfth century when, it seems, things were beginning to improve. Is biography still a legitimate activity for professional historians in the twenty-first century? A second group of papers considers different types of biographical writing in the middle ages. These are jokes that presented what purport to be stories of private experiences to a public of courtiers. Whilst drawing attention to the differences in language and content, she nevertheless points to a remarkable overlap of vocabulary which raises questions about the education available to laymen.

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