The political economy of violence against women oxford studies in gender and international relations. Political Economy of Violence against Women 2019-01-26

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the political economy of violence against women oxford studies in gender and international relations

As such they cannot appreciate the significance of feminist analyses of gender identity. The end of the Cold War also had a profound impact on the political opportunities available for principled, non-state actors to participate in global politics and put nontraditional issues on global policy agendas. International Studies Review 6 2 , 253—69. Spike Peterson published a book titled Gendered States in which she asked, what difference does gender make in international relations and the construction of the sovereign state system? Journal of Peace Research 40 3 , 287—302. Bashevkin explores the extent to which each of these women was able to fully participate in a domain long dominated by men, focusing in particular on the extent to which each shaped foreign policy in meaningful ways. Moreover, few critical International Political Economy scholars have considered the implications of the crisis of social reproduction emerging due to a dramatic demographic decline in many countries around the world for an exception, see Bakker and Gill. Many feminist theorists trace their interest in international relations as an area of study to their involvement in Cold War peace movements and in feminist peace politics that go back to World War I and efforts to broker international peace and security in the League of Nations Rupp.

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Feminism and Gender Studies in International Relations Theory

the political economy of violence against women oxford studies in gender and international relations

Like mainstream scholars, critical theorists have tended to focus on the macro and formal aspects of political economies and in so doing, produced incomplete analyses of change. Alternatives 16 1 , 67—106. International Studies Quarterly 42 1 , 197—202. By contrast, feminist and constructivist International Relations theories appear on their face to be much more compatible and have been combined in different ways in several influential studies Keck and Sikkink ; Prugl. New York: Columbia University Press. Millennium: Journal of International Studies 10 2 , 126—55. However, some constructivist research is more promising from a feminist perspective.

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The Political Economy of Violence against Women

the political economy of violence against women oxford studies in gender and international relations

At the same time the European Union formally adopted gender mainstreaming as a methodology for paying attention to gender inequalities and differences across all policy domains and areas of competency. The distinctive difference between British and possibly European, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand, etc. Women, Culture, and International Relations. Feminist Methodologies for International Relations. Keywords: , , , Introduction Feminist perspectives on international relations seek to understand existing gender relations — the dominance of masculinities over femininities — in order to transform how they work at all levels of global social, economic, and political life. Tickner observed that feminist International Relations in the 1990s was mostly devoted one way or another to analyzing international political economy, in particular the gendered dimensions and effects of economic globalization.

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The Political Economy of Violence against Women (Oxford Studies in Gender and International Relations) eBook: Jacqui True: blueshirtsunited.com: Kindle Store

the political economy of violence against women oxford studies in gender and international relations

The Political Economy of Violence against Women develops a feminist political economy approach to identify the linkages between different forms of violence against women and macro structural processes in strategic local and global sites - from the household to the transnational level. Nor could they explain it. Feminist scholars used gender analysis to deconstruct the theoretical framework of International Relations, and reveal the masculine bias pervading key concepts such as power, security, and sovereignty see True. This might involve examining the meanings of gender as they are institutionalized in new rules and hegemonies, and critically scrutinizing them in terms of feminist goals and criteria for a more gender-just world order. Implications for International Conduct In addition to epistemological and ontological differences, feminists differ with respect to the implications for ethical conduct they draw from their theory. International Studies Quarterly 41 4 , 611—32.

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The Political Economy of Violence against Women (Oxford Studies in Gender and International Relations) eBook: Jacqui True: blueshirtsunited.com: Kindle Store

the political economy of violence against women oxford studies in gender and international relations

This paper explores how efforts to regulate sexuality figure within processes of violent state formation. Each chapter assesses where journalism is today, its strengths and itschallenges, and highlights ways to improve upon it for tomorrow. What do we know about women's participation as decision-makers in international affairs? Failing to look beyond elites and the systemic level, the major flaws of realist explanations were exposed. Dominant realist theories of international relations, singularly focused on power politics among states and to a large extent the Cold War between the two superpowers, did not anticipate this transformation. In short, some feminists locate gender within material structures whereas other feminists see gender as present in discursive processes.

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Political Economy of Violence against Women

the political economy of violence against women oxford studies in gender and international relations

Please or to access full text content. In the United Kingdom, best doctoral dissertation and best published article prizes go to scholars of gender and international relations, many PhDs are produced in the subfield, and scholars go on to take up regular international relations positions in major British universities. Using a wide range of case studies, topics include: Journalism's role in a democracy Source dynamics in news production Journalism ethics Sexism and racism in the news Tabloidization, scandals and celebrity Reporting conflict, terrorism and war The future of investigative journalism The book is written in a lively manner designed to invite discussion by identifying key questionsaround a critical issue. Postmodern feminists dispute even provisional and diversified feminist standpoints on international relations. These norms implicitly guide feminists to put into practice their own critical theories, epistemologies, and explicit normative commitments. It involved a small number of companies harvesting government-owned forests or government-leased forests, confined to a few isolated locations, operating under close government supervision. However, while International Relations critical theorists acknowledge the importance of change-oriented theorizing, International Relations feminists privilege the moment of political practice in the process of theorizing and judge normative and ethical theories in terms of the practical possibilities they open up Robinson.

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The Political Economy of Violence against Women

the political economy of violence against women oxford studies in gender and international relations

International Studies Review 4 3 , 153—66. The majority of International Relations feminists conceive of gender as the relational construction of individual masculine and feminine identities, where masculine identities are preferred over feminine ones, and are a signifier for power relations of domination and subordination among individuals and collectivities more generally Peterson. Military security, the reinstatement of political order and the rule of law are enacted without consideration of their social and economic impacts and prioritised over social and economic aspects of security. It is important not to underestimate the specialized empirical, theoretical, and methodological knowledge required to develop a gender perspective on any given global or international relations issue. Until very recently, it has overwhelmingly been the case that men, and male experiences, have been used as the standard for international humanitarian law.

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The Political Economy of Violence against Women

the political economy of violence against women oxford studies in gender and international relations

There are several promising avenues for the future of feminist International Relations that involve closer engagement with other International Relations theories. Nowhere in the world do women share equal social and economic rights with men or the same access as men to productive resources. For questions on access or troubleshooting, please check our , and if you can''t find the answer there, please. In sum, feminist dialogic approaches seek common, albeit contested, ground among feminists, situated in different contexts and struggles around the world, as well as among feminist and nonfeminist International Relations theories, divided by their different ways of knowing and seeing the world see Tickner. Most research see wartime sexual violence as solutions to battlefields challenges. Generated within and through the feminist International Relations scholarly collective, this self-reflexive norm helps feminist theorists to be more conscious of the political exclusions that result from their normative purposes, choices of research subject and methodology, and to take responsibility for these exclusions. These norms implicitly guide feminists to put into practice their own critical theories, epistemologies, and explicit normative commitments.

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Oxford Studies in Gender and International Relations

the political economy of violence against women oxford studies in gender and international relations

International Studies Perspectives 3 4 , 333—50. The role played by global processes such as neoliberal economic policies, armed conflict, natural disasters and other crises in reinforcing existing gender inequalities and creating new forms of marginalization are highlighted. As well as the different theoretical treatment of gender as an analytic category and gender as a variable, relational gender and intersectional gender, International Relations feminists vary in how they understand the construction and reproduction of gender relations. As well as contributing to a critical sociology of international relations, feminists have shown themselves to be more praxis-oriented than nonfeminist critical theorists. These feminist theoretical differences revolve around, firstly, epistemological stance, secondly, feminist concepts of gender relations, and thirdly, feminist normative approaches to world politics. Feminist scholars such as Ann Tickner, Spike Peterson, Jan Jindy Pettman, Ann Runyan, and Christine Sylvester 1994 contested the exclusionary, state-centric and positivist nature of the discipline.

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