The democratic dilemma reforming the canadian senate. Canadians want to reform or abolish Senate: polls 2019-02-20

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The democratic dilemma : reforming the Canadian Senate / edited by Jennifer Smith

the democratic dilemma reforming the canadian senate

They demonstrate how complicated Senate reform is, full of unexpected twists and turns, and show that successful reform requires a deep understanding of the country's parliamentary system and culture and a delicate approach to institutional change. They argue that we need to start somewhere. The general population, political parties, or social organizations can nominate candidates for the Senatu. By the end of the 1990s, that had ballooned to around 40 per cent and had even briefly supplanted reform as the preferred option. Contributorsinclude Jane Ajzenstat McMaster University , Peter Aucoin Dalhousie University , Louise Carbert Dalhousie University , Don Desserud University of New Brunswick in Saint John , Andrew Heard Simon Fraser University , Tom Kent Institute for Research on Public Policy and Queen's University , Stephen Michael MacLean independent scholar , Lorna Marsden York University , Vincent Pouliot lawyer and entrepreneur, Quebec , Hugh Segal Senate of Canada , David Smith University of Regina , Nadia Verrelli Queen's University , Ron Watts Queen's University , and John Whyte University of Saskatchewan.

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Canadians want to reform or abolish Senate: polls

the democratic dilemma reforming the canadian senate

Bercholc Institute of Social and Legal Research Ambrosio L. The papers are expected to be relatively short, or approximately 2000 words, although lengthier ones certainly are welcome. After three years, the other half will follow suit and resign their position. Quebec, Ontario, the maritimes and the west were allotted twenty-four Senators each. This whole scheme makes no sense at all.

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The Democratic Dilemma: Reforming the Canadian Senate by Jennifer Smith

the democratic dilemma reforming the canadian senate

An elected Senate would signify a radical change in our parliamentary system because it would entirely refashion the relationship between the House of Commons and the Senate. Federal Dimensions of Reform of the Supreme Court of Canada is the second instalment in the series. He admitted to the Special Senate Committee on Senate Reform on September 7, 2006, I can just say that my frank hope is that the process would force the provinces and others to, at some point in the future, seriously address other questions of Senate reform. The tradition of stacking the Senate, due to appointment, must not be allowed to continue. Federal institutions should not be constantly hampered by opposition between two elected chambers. If nothing else, these events demonstrate an unsettled attitude towards the process used to select judges to the Supreme Court.

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The democratic dilemma : reforming the Canadian Senate / edited by Jennifer Smith

the democratic dilemma reforming the canadian senate

Countries such as Poland and the United States have a more effective Senate, and therefore a more efficient government. Constitutional debate over unity and Quebec's future in the country is in the heart of every Canadian today. Rothstein was the first - and to date the only - nominee required to face questions in a public hearing from a committee of the House of Commons established for the purpose. There is no clear way to appease the province of Quebec, and perhaps there never will be under any system. A Gallup poll conducted in 1961 did ask the question, however, and found that support for elected senators was already widespread. In 2006 Prime Minister Stephen Harper's Conservative government introduced two bills to reform the Senate: one to establish limited terms for senators, replacing the existing system of appointment until age 75 and the other to establish consultative elections for the Senate with the prime minister nominating the winners of the election.

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The democratic dilemma : reforming the Canadian Senate / edited by Jennifer Smith

the democratic dilemma reforming the canadian senate

But if we look abroad United States, Australia , we see that an elected Senate essentially duplicates the partisan cleavages and ideological polarization of the lower chamber. Support for abolishing the Senate is creeping upwards, and the recent scandals seem unlikely to reverse the trend. Conservative ministers like Peter Van Loan, who have attacked the people and the institution, reveal more about their mean-spirited myopia and institutional inexperience. He must tell us why he thinks the governments of our federation should immerse themselves in new constitutional meganegotiations instead of putting all their efforts into economic recovery and job creation. I myself am sympathetic to the view that in a democracy, all parliamentarians--as legislators who make, refine or reject the laws--should be elected. The Prime Minister must come clean with Canadians.

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The Democratic Dilemma: Reforming the Canadian Senate

the democratic dilemma reforming the canadian senate

But the government is running into strong political headwinds. Publisher's Summary The process used to select judges of the Supreme Court of Canada has provoked criticism from the start. If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to. There would be eight Senators elected by each province, regardless of the size of the province and its population. Support for abolition dropped back down to around 30 per cent in the 2000s, but there has been another uptick in the last few years.

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Canadians want to reform or abolish Senate: polls

the democratic dilemma reforming the canadian senate

Quebec Premier Jean Charest has announced that if this unilateral Senate reform goes forward, his government will challenge its constitutionality in the courts. Support for abolition hardly budged from that 1961 poll to the 1980s, when around 20 per cent of Canadians preferred getting rid of the Senate instead of keeping it as is or reforming it in some manner. This is simply not true, and this becomes apparent when analyzing the current Canadian Senate. These scenarios are particularly unwelcome when we should be combining our efforts to face the economic, social and environmental challenges of our time. The citizens elect two Senators from each state, regardless of size, for a term of six years. Each of us is qualified to a high level in our area of expertise, and we can write you a fully researched, fully referenced complete original answer to your essay question.

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Democratic Dilemma, The

the democratic dilemma reforming the canadian senate

A blow to Alberta and British Columbia Wrong for the whole of Canada, this bill is especially unfair and ill-conceived for two of our provinces, Alberta and British Columbia, which are underrepresented in the Senate. Senate Reform: What Does the Constitution Say? The government's reform would make the situation much worse. Secondly, since the party in power appoints Senators when vacancies occur, the tendency has been to appoint people with connections to that party. The other is procedural and concerns the federal government's strategy of treating Senate reform as a matter for Parliament alone to determine - a matter of federal legislation rather than an amendment of the constitution. As well, Senators had to be seen as a conservative restraint on the young, the impressionable, and the impulsive in the House of Commons Van Loon and Whittington pg. As well, eight Senators would be given to the territories. Gioja , Eugénie Brouillet Université Laval , Erin Crandall McGill University , Neil Cruickshank Algoma University , F.

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The Democratic Dilemma: Reforming the Canadian Senate

the democratic dilemma reforming the canadian senate

Many appointments to the Senate are rewards for 'a job well done'. The largest Australian state is only 12 times more populous than the smallest, compared with 70 times in Canada. Since it is so apparent that the Senate requires reform, the question isn't so much as to why and if it should be reformed, but rather to how? Before that date, the government simply made an appointment directly, without evident consultation. The Federal Dimensions of Reforming the Supreme Court of Canada Call for Paper Proposals The appointment of Marshall Rothstein to the Supreme Court of Canada in March 2006 made Canadian history. Let us look at the numbers. But the only way you end up with more comprehensive reform is if you destabilize the status quo to the point where Canadians say, 'This is a mess, and we've got to sort this out.

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