In crimes archive the cultural afterlife of evidence. Research Seminar 2019-02-04

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Cultural Afterlife of Criminal Evidence

in crimes archive the cultural afterlife of evidence

In this special issue, articles examine some of these questions in the work of individual African artists as they intervene in archival This article explores anxieties over the challenge digitisation poses to our established notions of art, culture and the media. However, these rules and procedures cannot govern or control this material after proceedings have ended. It begins by setting out some of the relationships between photography and criminology as they have evolved over time to enable a richer understanding of how the modern criminal subject is constructed and how archival practices have a significant bearing on how meanings are organized. It might be photographic or video evidence, private diaries and correspondence, weapons, physical objects or forensic data, an. Better ways of protecting what is important to us might be achieved through acts of sensitivity.

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In Crimes Archive: The Cultural Afterlife of Evidence

in crimes archive the cultural afterlife of evidence

This article opens a special section on the politics of opacity and openness. Whilst this article does not argue against the release of criminal archival material, it demands that any release is nevertheless sensitive to the consequences that may flow. For example, visitors could see a small jar of maggots in formaldehyde, retrieved from the homicide victims of Dr. Information about the documentary is accessible at:. Book Descriptions This book investigates what happens to criminal evidence after the conclusion of legal proceedings. About the Speaker is a legal scholar, criminologist and historian.

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In Crimeโ€™s Archive

in crimes archive the cultural afterlife of evidence

Scholars have turned toward criminal evidence in both their teaching and research practices. Photofile, 2005 78, a special issue on the archive. Particularly as drone technologies are easily adaptable to changing environments, often concealing its security and surveillance capabilities, commercial and domestic participants in this trend must be critically aware of the potential. Pictures from a drawer: Prison and the art of portraiture. Building on a growing cultural interest in criminal archival materials, this book shows how in its afterlife, criminal evidence gives rise to new uses and interpretations, new concepts and questions, many of which are creative and transformative of crime and evidence, and some of which are transgressive, dangerous or insensitive. Some of this work grapples with the accusations of voyeurism that arise when one looks without permission Hanrahan, 1999.

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In Crime's Archive: The Cultural Afterlife of Evidence

in crimes archive the cultural afterlife of evidence

It might be photographic or video evidence, private diaries and correspondence, weapons, physical objects or forensic data, and it arouses the interest of journalists, scholars, curators, writers or artists. Oxford Art Journal, 25 1 , 59โ€”70. In 2008, the visual artist William E. Evidence, Archive, and Afterlife Finding facts, resolving disputed facts, and deciding what happened are the core purposes of litigation. . Within the visual arts through the 20th century, the archive had been the site of repeated return by artists confronting history, historicity, order, linearity, time and bureaucracy. It takes the judicial principle of open justice โ€” the assumption that justice must be seen to be done โ€” and investigates instances in which we might see too much, too little or from a distorted angle.

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In Crime's Archive

in crimes archive the cultural afterlife of evidence

He was convicted of manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility and sentenced to 15 years in prison, of which he served 11, before his release in 1977. However, after the conclusion of the trial, this material returns to a notional archive and is sometimes used by artists, scholars, curators and others, but subject to no rules or standards. Building on a growing cultural interest in criminal archival materials, this book shows how in its afterlife, criminal evidence gives rise to new uses and interpretations, new concepts and questions, many of which are creative and transformative of crime and evidence, and some of which are transgressive, dangerous or insensitive. Formally regarded as part of the court record, and subject to the rules of evidence within the trial, beyond the trial this material has aroused the interest of artists, publishers, historians, curators and journalists who wish to access and use this material for a wide range of purposes, some of which might be transgressive, dangerous or insensitive. With the help of social media, the video received mass attention from news organizations in the United States by June 22, 2009. Traversing museums, libraries, galleries and other repositories, and drawing on extensive interviews with cultural practitioners and legal professionals, this book probes the legal, ethical, affective and aesthetic implications of the cultural afterlife of evidence.

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Open Justice and Open Secrets: The Cultural Afterlife of Criminal Evidence

in crimes archive the cultural afterlife of evidence

It takes the judicial principle of open justice--the assumption that justice must be seen to be done--and investigates instances in which we might see too much, too little or from a distorted angle. However, these rules and procedures cannot govern or control this material after proceedings have ended. The fact that Lindy Chamberlain-Creighton herself elected to give these materials an afterlife by donating them to national collection institutions is an important ethical and historical decision, ensuring that in our understanding of crime and criminal justice, we remain vigilant against miscarriages of justice. Washington Law Review, 79, 119โ€”158. It relates not only to the preservation of materials, but also how they are organized and imagined, the various ways that responsibility is taken for this material, and the relationships that are formed with it. It must also be noted that legal and non-legal users are not necessarily separate cohorts; law and culture are always and already interdependent. Thinking sensitively might offer a promising way through the darker territory in which criminal evidence sometimes dwells after the conclusion of proceedings.

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The cultural afterlife of criminal evidence

in crimes archive the cultural afterlife of evidence

See also Photofile, 2005 and Source, 2012. Police increasingly rely on new media software for public communication and policing operations. He is currently serving a life sentence for six counts of murder and two counts of attempted murder, but he is suspected of having killed at least 12 young men. During the criminal trial, evidentiary material is tightly regulated; it is formally regarded as part of the court record, and subject to the rules of evidence and criminal procedure. In the digital age, much evidentiary material is born digital, including photographic images, closed-circuit television footage, citizen footage, visual recordings of police interviews, social media content, and electronic communications.

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In Crime's Archive: The Cultural Afterlife of Evidence

in crimes archive the cultural afterlife of evidence

The curators were conscious of distinguishing between public knowledge, public interest, and public demand. Institutions holding medical scientific collections, human remains and indigenous cultural heritage have already undergone long processes for the development of guidelines and frameworks for decision-making about access, display and use of their collections. Some images from this collection can be viewed here:. While the choice between secrecy and transparency has political and cultural salience, this paper questions the logic of such an opposition. Similarly, the combined effect of increased availability of forensic images, the selective release of images by law enforcement during investigations, and a move towards open access to court records, generates multiple potential end users, including advocacy groups, media organisations and visual artists. Augmented by private diaries, images of exhibits, and the substantial and eclectic contents of police briefs of evidence, these evidentiary materials are made available to media agencies during the trial, and they might be viewed by public audiences at the same time as they are being examined by jurors or judicial officers.

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In Crimeโ€™s Archive

in crimes archive the cultural afterlife of evidence

The art of bureaucracy: Redacted readymades. Scholars need to move fromarchive-as-source to archive-as-subject. It is argued here that additional emphasis could usefully be placed on stories of resistance in which the monological production site of the prison or police station transforms into a dialogical site, in which the objects of police photography can acquire agency. Archival materials form the basis for transgressively imagined pasts, as in the work of Tom Sachs and Alan Schechner, who played with alternative endings or aesthetic aspects of the Nazi Holocaust Biber,. Death is not a standardized moment or an equal event; it can be untimely, premature, and violent.

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