Contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo. Contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse (eBook, 2009) [blueshirtsunited.com] 2019-01-27

Contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo Rating: 5,9/10 749 reviews

Jo Woodiwiss

contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo

Most of those who acknowledged their own inner child believed they were introduced to the concept during the course of their healing and recovery, although even here the idea of an inner self, who could be childlike, was not totally alien to them. It explores the role women play in constructing their own sexual abuse narratives based on what they define as continuous, recovered, or false memories. This paper does not seek to establish the 'truth' or 'falsity' of women's accounts but starts from the belief that their accounts are true to them. In doing so we draw on the stories that are currently circulating but these are themselves both culturally and historically specific Bauman 2001, Jackson 1998, Lawler 2002, Plummer 1995, 2001. As we conclude this collection, we reflect on some of the exciting, rich and diverse opportunities and challenges presented by feminist narrative research.

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Bridging the gap between past and present: Childhood sexual abuse, recovery and the contradictory self, Women's Studies International Forum

contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo

This gives her scope to organise special events, such as the adoption conference that will take place at the University at the start of November, coinciding with National Adoption Week. Why are women more likely to be positioned or diagnosed as mad than men? In this chapter I discuss narrative frameworks and dominant narratives. The majority of the women identified an inner child, or childlike part of their adult selves, as a valuable, although not always straightforward or unproblematic, concept. Much of this discussion is conducted within a discourse of sexual rights and sexual entitlement within which abuse victims are encouraged to claim their rights to sexual pleasure and satisfaction. Such narratives can influence how social workers perceive and respond to abuse and indeed whether sexual activities involving young people are understood as abusive. They may have been constrained by stories that can be told and the narrative frameworks available to them Bauman 2001, Gergen 1994, Plummer 1995, 2001 but they were nonetheless actively engaged in constructing their own stories — stories which owe more to our contemporary storying of childhood sexual abuse and those narrative frameworks currently in circulation than they do to the recovery of memories. These effects include a problematic relationship with issues relating to sex.

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J. Woodiwiss: Contesting Stories of Childhood Sexual Abuse (PDF)

contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo

It is through our story telling that we construct a sense of place, a sense of self and a sense of purpose. The powerful, self-determining self, the self of the human potential movement see Maslow 1970, Rogers 1970 and the reflexive self of Giddens 1991 is undermined at the same time as we are encouraged to connect with it. This article explores how girls' and young women's sexual behaviours have been and currently are constructed and responded to within social work. Bridging the gap between past and present: Childhood sexual abuse, recovery and the contradictory self Bridging the gap between past and present: Childhood sexual abuse, recovery and the contradictory. And, as Woodiwiss says, the frameworks within which stories are told are very important. In a western world increasingly informed by therapeutic discourses, adult women are told they are entitled to happiness and success and failure to do so is seen to result from past often traumatic experiences which might or might not be remembered. This paper presents findings from an in-depth study of sixteen women in Britain, which looked at women's engagement with the recovery literature aimed at adult victims of childhood sexual abuse and, in particular, that aspect of the literature which dealt with sex.

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Review of Woodiwiss, Jo: Contesting Stories of Childhood Sexual Abuse

contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo

One such cause is said to be childhood sexual abuse and the self-help literature aimed at survivors of such abuse encourages readers to use the idea l of an active sexual self as a measure of health, well-being and ultimately womanhood. This paper does not seek to establish the 'truth' or 'falsity' of women's accounts but starts from the belief that their accounts are true to them. However, the identities we construct do not indicate a stable, core self, unchanging through each individual's progress through life Hall, 1996. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. The E-mail message field is required.

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Childhood adoption experiences: Effect later in adulthood

contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo

Where I would enjoy a debate with the author, however, is in relation to the literature within which the data is placed and which is used to support the overall argument. We tell stories to make sense of our lives and who we are, to justify or explain our actions, and to guide us through life. The self of late modernity is a process, continually under re construction rather than something we have. The majority of those who participated in this research did not have 'concrete memories' of sexual abuse but based their belief that they were sexually abused in childhood on a form of 'recovered memories' of sexual abuse that involves a correlation of perceived 'symptoms' with assumed past abuse. Jones and Da Breo Chap. As this research showed, any single story cannot accommodate all experiences. Central to this construction of womanhood is what drawing on Rich 1980 I have called 'compulsory sexuality' whereby the healthy adult woman is constructed as sexually knowledgeable, active and desirous.

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J. Woodiwiss: Contesting Stories of Childhood Sexual Abuse (PDF)

contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo

The article argues for the need to separate wrongfulness from harm and sexual innocence from childhood. This paper draws on a research project exploring women's engagement with the sexual abuse recovery literature and in particular the constructions of the self found in this literature. We argue that there is merit in separating out wrongfulness from harm in how social workers respond to such issues. Within this therapeutic culture priority is given to self-actualisation and personal fulfilment and the self is increasingly seen as a project to be worked on. As such, the collection not only discusses some of the opportunities and challenges of doing feminist narrative research but is at the same time also an important, albeit at times challenging, read. Dr Woodiwiss -- who is the author of the book Contesting Stories of Childhood Sexual Abuse -- was elected co-convenor of the British Sociological Association's families and relationships study group at this year's annual conference of the association.

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Childhood adoption experiences: Effect later in adulthood

contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo

Dr Woodiwiss explained that her research focuses on childhood experiences and -- in particular -- the effect of those experiences on adulthood. Nowhere are these contradictory formulations of the self Simonds, 1996 more evident than in the self-help and recovery literature of the contemporary Western world Woodiwiss, 2009. The majority of those who participated in this research did not have 'concrete memories' of sexual abuse but based their belief that they were sexually abused in childhood on a form of 'recovered memories' of sexual abuse that involves a correlation of perceived 'symptoms' with assumed past abuse. The inner child, in some form, is a pervasive presence in many aspects of contemporary culture. In this chapter I look at these contradictory formulations and explore women experiences of finding, constructing and putting back together their own selves, both core and makeable, static and becoming.

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Contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse (eBook, 2009) [blueshirtsunited.com]

contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo

Adult victims of childhood sexual abuse are said to frequently report sexual unhappiness Bartoi and Kinder 1998, Jackson et al 1990 , to feel shame or guilt about how they respond sexually and have difficulty trusting sexual partners, and in the case of women to often engage in sexually risky behaviours through which they might be exposed to sexually transmitted infections and sexual assaults. We live in a society of story telling in which we constantly tell and retell our life stories. Rutvica Andrijasevic Migration, Agency and Citizenship in Sex Trafficking. It will be of interest to students and academics in Sociology, Psychology, Social Work and Gender Studies, as well as those working in the field of sexual abuse. This paper does not seek to establish the 'truth' or 'falsity' of women's accounts but starts from the belief that their accounts are true to them. The aim of this collection is to bring together feminist scholarship and narrative research in order to explore how feminist narrative research can be employed to understand and potentially improve the lives of self-identified women. I look at these memories as a source of knowledge on which women base their narratives and sense of self.

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Childhood adoption experiences: Effect later in adulthood

contesting stories of childhood sexual abuse woodiwiss jo

In telling our stories we draw on currently circulating narrative frameworks which, in the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries, are infused with a therapeutic culture of self-help and self-development. Dr Jo Woodiwiss is a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University and she has recently been elected co-convenor of the British Sociological Association's study group dealing with families and relationships. Failure to heal may condemn victims to a life of misery, devoid of happiness or success, in which they are likely to be victimised again in adulthood largely women or victimise others largely men. In her recent book Ehrenreich 2010 bitterly complains about the positive thinking narrative that places pressure on those with breast cancer to cure themselves. Woodiwiss, Jo 2013-05-01 00:00:00 Introduction The late 20th and early 21st centuries have seen the encroachment of therapeutic culture into more and more aspects of everyday and not so everyday life. The child, or child-like, self who features in discourses of childhood sexual abuse recovery occupies a central position in relation to both knowledge and healing.

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